Where Do Our Premiums Go?

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If the insurance companies win, you lose.

If reform passes without a choice of a public health insurance option, if insurers can keep denying care for pre-existing conditions, and if you can’t afford health insurance, the insurance companies will keep making money while you will keep losing out. It’s really that simple.

We must fight back.

Today, thousands of people across the country are taking the fight directly to the insurance companies. We’ll be presenting them with a list of demands: Stop denying our care and stop using our premiums to lobby against health reform.

Click here to fax your insurance company these demands. A copy will be sent to the Senate Finance Committee, who are debating the “Baucus Bill” today.

For years the insurance companies have expanded their total stranglehold over health care. They make record profits. The make life-and-death decisions. And they’re spending millions of dollars on campaign contributions and lobbyists to defeat reform – nearly $700,000 per day!1

That’s your money they’re spending to defeat health care reform and the choice of a public health insurance option.

You’re a customer and a person with a voice, so you can fight back. Click here to fax your demands to the insurance industry and join thousands who are doing the same thing today.

We’ll make sure your message gets to your insurer, your Members of Congress, and Members of the Senate Finance Committee, who are starting to work on the Baucus Bill – a bill that gives the insurance industry everything it wants.2

Thank you for fighting back against the insurance industry.

Let’s clog up their fax machines! Click here.

With your help, we’ll be the ones who will win.

To your health,

Levana Layendecker
Health Care for America Now

Police intervene in Congressman Pete Olson’s meeting

Congressman “Deer in the headlights” Pete Olson (R-TX) gets run over by his constituents and the police had to take over the meeting. The first part is Olson exploiting a child with a serious heart defect for political points. The second part is the crowd giving him hell for it to the point a scuffle breaks out. The Police are called in and threatens to cancel Olson’s meeting.

Republican Congressman Olson uses child’s heart condition for political and unsuccessful gain

Republican Congressman Olson (R-TX) tells the townhall about a mother who was turned away by the free market doctors for her unborn child’s heart defect. She was denied by the free market doctors but persisted and was able to find a specialized doctor and got a very delicate operation and a heart transplant 17 days after he was born. Olson then claims that the public option would have denied him the needed health care and he would have died! After being challenged he abruptly ended the discussion. Watch as he is challenged, and clueless as to what to say.

Two-Faced Anti-Reform Strategy

Wendell Potter, former CIGNA Healthcare Director of Communications explains the insurance industry practice of rescission

Five Ways to Improve Max Baucus’s Bill

By Ezra Klein  |  September 16, 2009

There’s a lot more to say about the provisions in Baucus’s bill, and perhaps I’ll continue picking through the legislation tomorrow. But we basically covered the big-ticket items today. Max Baucus’s bill is a very good platform with some very severe failings. The guts of the bill, the things people don’t notice, are more fully fleshed out in this legislation than in the other bills I’ve seen. The exchanges, the risk adjustment, the delivery system reforms, the possibility of national insurance plans — all that is fully realized in this bill. But the legislation has some serious, even crippling, flaws. Here are five ways to improve it…Read More

What Do Doctors Think About Health Care Reform?

Poll Finds Most Doctors Support Public Option

by Joseph Shapiro

Among all the players in the health care debate, doctors may be the least understood about where they stand on some of the key issues around changing the health care system. Now, a new survey finds some surprising results: A large majority of doctors say there should a public option.

When polled, “nearly three-quarters of physicians supported some form of a public option, either alone or in combination with private insurance options,” says Dr. Salomeh Keyhani. She and Dr. Alex Federman, both internists and researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, conducted a random survey, by mail and by phone, of 2,130 doctors. They surveyed them from June right up to early September…Read More

Doctors on Coverage — Physicians’ Views on a New Public Insurance Option and Medicare Expansion

Salomeh Keyhani, M.D., M.P.H., and Alex Federman, M.D., M.P.H.

In the past few months, a key point of contention in the health care reform debate has been whether a public health insurance option should be included in the final legislation. Although polls have shown that 52 to 69% of Americans support such an option,1 the views of physicians are unclear. Physicians are critical stakeholders in health care reform and have been influential in shaping health policy throughout the history of organized medicine in the United States.2

The voices of physicians in the current debate have emanated almost exclusively from national physicians’ groups and societies. Like any special-interest group, these organizations claim to represent their members (and often nonmembers as well). The result is a well-established understanding of the interests of physicians’ societies but little, if any, understanding of views among physicians in general. Faced with this absence of empirical data, we conducted a national survey of physicians to inform federal policymakers about physicians’ views of proposed expansions of health care coverage…Read More

AMA open to government-funded health insurance option

(CNN) — The new president of the American Medical Association, which represents the interests of the nation’s doctors, said Wednesday the group is open to a government-funded health insurance option for people without coverage.

Dr. J. James Rohack told CNN the AMA supports an “American model” that includes both “a private system and a public system, working together.”

In May, the AMA told a Senate committee it did not support a government-sponsored public health insurance option…Read More

Dr. Rohack, President of the AMA: The Status Quo Is Unacceptable

This morning, the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee held a forum to highlight the urgent need for comprehensive health insurance reform. Rep. John Dingell asks J. James Rohack, MD, President of the American Medical Association (AMA), about the AMA’s thoughts on America’s Affordable Health Choices Act.

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Many Employers to Raise Cost of Health Benefits

Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Though Americans who already have medical coverage may be wary of change, a new survey indicates that they may be hard-pressed to escape it — even in the absence of health-care reform…Read More